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From the JPMorgan Chase Policy Center: “Enhancing Economic Opportunity and Mobility for People with Disabilities through Asset and Income Limit Reforms”

I’d like to share some exciting news from my employer that reflects something I’ve been advocating for since I joined the firm. The JPMorgan Chase  Policy Center  recently released a policy brief — “Enhancing Economic Opportunity and Mobility for People with Disabilities through Asset and Income Limit Reforms” — that examines how current asset and income limits on federal benefits for people with disabilities create barriers to labor force participation and accumulating savings. The Policy Center proposes updating and simplifying the asset and income limits for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to expand economic opportunity and mobility for people with disabilities.  From my perspective, these antiquated limits not only inhibit our firm’s ability to recruit and benefit from talent within this community, but they also hamper employers’ efforts as a whole to advance diversity and inclusion while investing in their communities. Simply put, income limits imposed for government benefits e

Nations of the World Must do More as War Rages in the Ukraine

On March 13, 1964 a 28 year-old woman, Kitty Genovese, was stabbed to death in Kew Gardens, Queens, in New York City.  The New York Times newspaper covered the story and wrote a headline that read:  "38 (people) who saw the murder didn't call the police."  The outrage at the time of this story was that no one helped to stop the murder of this young woman -- not even a phone call was made at the time the crime was committed while Kitty was assaulted.  As I watched what is happening in the Ukraine, the parallel is surreal. In the United States, we are watching a society being destroyed in front of our very eyes on television as Ukrainians are being slaughtered, towns bombed, and families  separated. Although European nations and the United States seem to be helping, it doesn't seem to be enough as the Russian army continues to advance, destroy the country and take the lives of civilians and others.   Although Europe and the United States say they are helping, it doesn&#

The costs of living with a disability: A conversation with Jim Sinocchi

  The costs of living with a disability: A conversation with Jim Sinocchi            by Elana Duré                                                                                                  Content and Communications, J.P. Morgan Wealth Management Oct 06, 2021 • People with disabilities encounter a wide range of expenses, from medical and transportation costs to unrealized earnings because of barriers posed by societal limitations. • Jim Sinocchi, Head of Disability Inclusion at JPMorgan Chase, informs us about the challenges people with disabilities face in their daily lives. • From the workplace to public transportation, communities have work left to do in building a more inclusive society for people with disabilities. People with disabilities encounter a wide range of out-of-pocket expenses, including medical expenses and transportation costs. Estimates show that households with an adult who has a work-disability require an average of 28% more income, or an additional $17,690

Empowering People with Disabilities to Become Leaders And Drive Inclusion Forward

Jim Sinocchi, JPMorgan Chase's managing director with the Global Office of Disability Inclusion, discusses how a growing understanding of prejudice can change the way we view disability and prepare society for a new generation of leaders. In 2020, amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing struggle for racial equality in America, intersectionality became a powerful tool for addressing prejudice. Coined in 1989 by American lawyer and civil rights advocate Kimberlé Crenshaw, intersectionality explores how different aspects of a person's identity combine to create different modes of discrimination and privilege. But while society has focused its attention on a variety of prejudices—including race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity and sexual orientation—one form of discrimination has gotten far less scrutiny: Disability.  The Stark Facts This is a problem I've experienced firsthand: As head of JPMorgan Chase's Global Office of Disability Inclusion, I work to advance opp
  Empowering People with Disabilities to Become Leaders And Drive Inclusion Forward Jim Sinocchi, JPMorgan Chase's managing director with the Global Office of Disability Inclusion, discusses how a growing understanding of prejudice can change the way we view disability and prepare society for a new generation of leaders. In 2020, amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing struggle for racial equality in America, intersectionality became a powerful tool for addressing prejudice. Coined in 1989 by American lawyer and civil rights advocate Kimberlé Crenshaw, intersectionality explores how different aspects of a person's identity combine to create different modes of discrimination and privilege. But while society has focused its attention on a variety of prejudices—including race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity and sexual orientation—one form of discrimination has gotten far less scrutiny: Disability.  The Stark Facts This is a problem I've experienced firsthand: As head

Pandemic Musings Amid COVID-19 -- There's much to be thankful for on this Memorial Day weekend

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I woke up Sunday morning sleeping on my left side, facing the window, and looking at a bright sunny day. My personal care assistant would be here in about an hour to help me up out of bed and get ready for the day. Body surfing can be fun, but also dangerous . As I stared out the window and listened to the birds chirping, I thought about being paralyzed for the past 40 years, since breaking my neck in a surfing accident on Condado Beach in Puerto Rico . I was 25 years old at the time of my accident and employed by the IBM Corporation. I was also an assistant swimming coach at the City College of New York, and working for my childhood coach and mentor Marcelino Rodriguez, whom I met at the St. Mary's Park Recreation Center in the Bronx, New York. At that time, I was 11 years-old, and wanted to learn how to swim. Actually, my brother Victor and I were encouraged to learn how to swim by our grandfather, after our Dad died at the young age of 28. For 40 years I have alterna

The Covid-19 Virus was depicted 178 years ago, by author Edgar Allen Poe, as the "Masque of the Red Death"

As I learned more about the infamous Covid-19 Virus in the newspaper and on television this week, as my wife and I remained secluded, the unconscious part of my brain was nagging me, pinging me that I heard about such a calamity before this news breaking occurrence.  "Where did I hear about such a pestilence before?,"  I thought. Then it came back to me, as I was having coffee this past Sunday morning as I watched the news. I recalled a story I read more than 35 years ago at Colgate University , a small but quaint college, located in Hamilton, New York. I was enrolled in an English Literature course, where we studied the writings of Edgar Allen Poe, among other authors of his generation. As many of you may know, New York State is one of the "hot spots" for the Covid-19 Virus as of this writing. And, what disturbed me was a news story that described "wealthy people" leaving New York City in the wake of the virus, and going to their mansions in the Hamp